Choke - PAIN!!!!

Author Comments
sl Resident 855 posts
We were learning some chokes last night.. is it right for your kneck / windpipe to be sore the day after feeling like a sore throat or should i get my arse the A & E ?
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Robsco 1319 posts
Sounds quite normal seeing as you've had people trying to crush your windpipe, but I'm no doctor. No-one can advise you whether or not to go.

And next time, tap sooner! :o) --------------------------------------------- Robsco! - The Site Administrator 'I'm sure your style is impressive on other planets, however, your weak link is that this is Earth'
The Admin Guy
sl Resident 855 posts
I tapped beleive me i tapped !!!!!!! Its not hurting too much just feels a bit sore, i take it its fairly normal then. It was a different sensai than usual ive never seen him before as i was watching him with other people he did seem to hold the choke well after the tapping began!
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Robsco 1319 posts
Sounds like a bad instructor then.

If someone doesn't let it go when you tap, and maybe even applies more pressure before finally letting go, you're gonna have a sore neck the next day.

But obviously it's commen-sense on your part if you wanna get it checked properly. --------------------------------------------- Robsco! - The Site Administrator 'I'm sure your style is impressive on other planets, however, your weak link is that this is Earth'
The Admin Guy
sl Resident 855 posts
Its actually fine now just a bit sore last night and this morning so dont think im gonna die. Like i say hes not a usual instructor and it could be because im new to it anyway. Thanks for the answers anyway !
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Falthor Newbie 10 posts
yeah I would say that wasa fairly normal occurence in my Judo and Ju-Jitsu career as I came up through the ranks. It's nto so much that too much pressure was applied as it is that to get to the point of tapping you have to apply enough pressure.

Does that make sense? although in all actuality chokes should never be applied to the front of the windpipe (judo chokes), when the Gi is involved there is always pressure there.
Bassmonger Resident 198 posts
Crushed windpipes are shit. Some fat bloke pretty much jumped on my neck with his forearm once, and I couldn't breath for about 10 seconds. I think Andy thought I was gonna die. I didn't though. For the next few days, swallowing hurt, and it felt sore and like I had something trapped in there for weeks. Not fun.

The best way is to choke them out first. Probably. "I like my jiu-jitsu the same way as I like pubic hair on a lady"


DEFEATED IN AL
Falthor Newbie 10 posts
I hear that Bassmonger. In a Judo tournament once I was thrown, the opponent followed me to the ground with all his weight behind a finst in my throat. NOT FUN.
steve Resident 217 posts
Chokes & strangles are obviously very dangerous and should be executed both in training & competition with great care. Your Sensei should have emphasised this strongly before anyone was allowed to mimic his demonstration. If you have not applied a choke / strangle before, or had one applied on you, then you have no perception of what is happening to your opponent, how much force is safe. etc.

In training when you first apply a new technique, even if your partner doesn't tap, when you feel you may have applied the technique (slowly / carefully first time) you should release. You can then ask your partner for feedback on how it felt and adjust to suit.

As a rule of thumb a choke on the windpipe will produce immediate effect / pain and leave damage (soft tissue bruising), hence in training take the position and 'feel you have control' then release...you do not have to choke the guy.

Strangles can take a few seconds before any effect, but will not always produce pain (the artery can be restricted without the nerves being trapped, hence once held 2 rules of thumb for safety:

1) be aware of how long you have held the strangle for (mental count of 3 secs then release)

2) observe your partner throughout...roll back of eyes, breathing noise (snoring like sound), reduction in resistance (ie feels like not fighting you off) are all signs that the guys lights are going out. Don't let it get that far.

Above all, if you have someone in your class who you know applies technique excessively & recklessly..don't partner them. Its not being soft its being sensible...and a good Sensie will spot the idiots and deal with them accordingly. "Its not the size of the dog in the fight, its the size of the fight in the dog"
"Its not the size of the dog i
steve Resident 217 posts
Chokes & strangles are obviously very dangerous and should be executed both in training & competition with great care. Your Sensei should have emphasised this strongly before anyone was allowed to mimic his demonstration. If you have not applied a choke / strangle before, or had one applied on you, then you have no perception of what is happening to your opponent, how much force is safe. etc.

In training when you first apply a new technique, even if your partner doesn't tap, when you feel you may have applied the technique (slowly / carefully first time) you should release. You can then ask your partner for feedback on how it felt and adjust to suit.

As a rule of thumb a choke on the windpipe will produce immediate effect / pain and leave damage (soft tissue bruising), hence in training take the position and 'feel you have control' then release...you do not have to choke the guy.

Strangles can take a few seconds before any effect, but will not always produce pain (the artery can be restricted without the nerves being trapped, hence once held 2 rules of thumb for safety:

1) be aware of how long you have held the strangle for (mental count of 3 secs then release)

2) observe your partner throughout...roll back of eyes, breathing noise (snoring like sound), reduction in resistance (ie feels like not fighting you off) are all signs that the guys lights are going out. Don't let it get that far.

Above all, if you have someone in your class who you know applies technique excessively & recklessly..don't partner them. Its not being soft its being sensible...and a good Sensie will spot the idiots and deal with them accordingly. "Its not the size of the dog in the fight, its the size of the fight in the dog"
"Its not the size of the dog i
Bassmonger Resident 198 posts
I still chuckle every time I think about when I choked Rob out in the pub. No warning at all, he just went.

"try a collar choke, I have this great defence" indeed. "I like my jiu-jitsu the same way as I like pubic hair on a lady"


DEFEATED IN AL
Robsco 1319 posts
hehe, now that was a corker! think the 7 pints kinda helped, there was no way you could have done it cos i had my hand in it, but still totally mad. --------------------------------------------- Robsco! - The Site Administrator 'I'm sure your style is impressive on other planets, however, your weak link is that this is Earth'
The Admin Guy
Robsco 1319 posts
Plus it was a great defence, cos you shat yourself afterwards thinking you'd killed me! :o) --------------------------------------------- Robsco! - The Site Administrator 'I'm sure your style is impressive on other planets, however, your weak link is that this is Earth'
The Admin Guy

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